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What are some potential parole violations to be mindful of?

On Behalf of | Jun 20, 2023 | Criminal Defense |

According to the Wisconsin Parole Commission, approximately 22,000 people were on parole in 2020. Navigating life post-incarceration can be a challenging journey, especially when living under the terms and conditions of parole.

Parole allows offenders to serve the remainder of their sentence within the community under supervision. However, maintaining parole status requires strict adherence to specific conditions. Not following the set conditions can cause the offender to violate their parole, which means they could get sent back to prison to finish the remainder of their sentence.

Committing a new crime

One way to violate parole is by committing a new crime. Regardless of the severity of the new offense, any criminal activity can lead to a parole violation. The courts will send parolees who commit a crime back to prison to complete their original sentence, and they may have to serve additional time for the new crime they committed.

Non-compliance with imposed conditions

Every parolee has specific conditions given to them by the Wisconsin Parole Commission at the time of their release. Not following those conditions can also lead to a violation. For instance, failing drug or alcohol tests, not attending mandatory meetings with a parole officer or not completing ordered community service can all constitute violations. The courts will often place the offender in jail while determining the violation’s severity.

Leaving the jurisdiction

One of the common conditions of parole is the restriction on leaving the state without permission. If a parolee leaves Wisconsin without obtaining the necessary authorization, they may be in violation of their parole.

Parolees can lead a happy life outside of prison, where they can successfully reintegrate back into society, as long as they understand the potential parole violations and adhere to all conditions.

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